Supporting quality glass recovery

Grants and Funding

Grants and Funding

We work with councils, recyclers and other stakeholders to improve outcomes for glass across New Zealand. Sometimes the required solutions need new infrastructure, equipment or funding for research.

In the first ten years of operation, levies paid by GPF member companies have granted applications of more than $1.8 million, and each year we approve further funding. Do you have a project that will see more glass recycled or reused? We’d love to help.

What’s the purpose?

The Forum specifically targets projects which:
1. result in an increase in container glass recovery; and/or
2. improve the quality of recovered container glass.

The Forum prioritises projects which enable glass bottles and jars to be returned to the furnace. However projects which support alternative local uses for glass that is unsuitable for recycling will also be considered.

What’s covered?

The Forum considers applications for projects that meet its aims for zero glass to landfill, and include infrastructure, plant and equipment, technology, research and events.

These projects can either help maintain existing recovery rates or result in new recovery volumes. They need to have a specified timeframe and a financial contribution from the applicant (though exceptions may apply). A Health and Safety plan and Business Plan (for applications over $5,000) are a must. Applications for ongoing financial support of existing activities will not be considered.

How do I apply?

There are three funding rounds each year in February, May and September.

Applications open on the first day of the month and close on the last day of the month. You can apply online or download a PDF form to complete offline. If you have any questions, please get in touch.

Here are some examples of this funding having a positive impact.

Grants awarded after 1 April 2017. For information about grants awarded prior to this please contact GPF Scheme Managers.

5R Solutions

What:
Breaker / Conveyor

Where:
5R Solutions – Christchurch hub

Why:
A more efficient method of crushing and loading 20foot containers was needed. This was a result of an increase in both glass to site and freight costs due to damage to SH1 from the Kaikoura earthquake.

Impact:
The machine allowed for colour-sorted glass to be broken and loaded into 20foot containers in one operation, which resulted in significant time savings. Also, by maximising the volume of glass going into the containers, substantial cost saving were achieved.

Community Recycling Centre

What:
Solar-powered wheelie bin lifter

Where:
Whangaparaoa Community Recycling Centre

Why:
The old glass handling system of emptying colour-sorted glass from wheelie bins into a hook bin was done by hand. This presented health and safety issues and meant the second hook bin needed to be placed outside the small site.

Impact:
The bin lifter greatly improved the efficiency of emptying glass into the hook bins. It also allows the second hook bin to sit within the site. This resulted in improved colour-sorted glass recovery.

Hastings District Council green bins

What:
Shipping containers repurposed into recycling drop off points

Where:
Seven sites around Hastings

Why:
Initially the desire was to give rural residents access to recycling drop off points but it was soon realised that the model could be applied to urban sites too.

Impact:
Improved recovery of recyclable materials, including colour-sorted glass.

Pak ‘n Save

What:
Glass bottlebank

Where:
Pak ‘n Save Queenstown

Why:
Aimed at giving the large number of tourists visiting the area access to a glass recycling facility, thus preventing glass going to landfill.

Impact:
Increased colour-sorted glass back to the furnace at O-I New Zealand.

Splore

What:
Boutique music festival

Where:
Auckland

Why:
Organisers wanted to train bar managers and staff to increase colour-separated glass “back of house”.

Impact:
The training increased the volume and quality of glass going back to the furnace at O-I New Zealand.

Auckland University

What:
Research into recycled aggregates and waste (including glass) for road construction

Where:
Auckland University

Why:
To investigate the performance existing recycled concrete aggregates, and further consider possible blends of materials for use in road construction.

Impact:
Study ongoing, but possible impacts could be increased use of comingled glass cullet as aggregate for road construction, rather than going to landfill.

Apply For a Grant

Contact us today to find out
if your project is eligible for a
GPF grant.